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  • It really won’t. Everything happens for a reason, good and bad, even though we may not understand it at the time. But what is meant for you, what you truly need, will not just pass by. It will stay with you and be there for you, always🙏❤️
  • It really won’t. Everything happens for a reason, good and bad, even though we may not understand it at the time. But what is meant for you, what you truly need, will not just pass by. It will stay with you and be there for you, always🙏❤️
  •  6  1 38 minutes ago

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  • 𝓐𝓶 𝓔𝓷𝓭𝓮 𝔀𝓲𝓻𝓭 𝓪𝓵𝓵𝓮𝓼 𝓰𝓾𝓽 𝓾𝓷𝓭 𝔀𝓮𝓷𝓷 𝓮𝓼 𝓷𝓸𝓬𝓱 𝓷𝓲𝓬𝓱𝓽 𝓰𝓾𝓽 𝓲𝓼𝓽 𝓭𝓪𝓷𝓷 𝓲𝓼𝓽 𝓮𝓼 𝓷𝓸𝓬𝓱 𝓷𝓲𝓬𝓱𝓽 𝓪𝓶 𝓔𝓷𝓭𝓮❤️🧸






    #insta #newfeed #user #sun #2019 #girl #draußen #berlin #germany #deutschland #featureme
  • 𝓐𝓶 𝓔𝓷𝓭𝓮 𝔀𝓲𝓻𝓭 𝓪𝓵𝓵𝓮𝓼 𝓰𝓾𝓽 𝓾𝓷𝓭 𝔀𝓮𝓷𝓷 𝓮𝓼 𝓷𝓸𝓬𝓱 𝓷𝓲𝓬𝓱𝓽 𝓰𝓾𝓽 𝓲𝓼𝓽 𝓭𝓪𝓷𝓷 𝓲𝓼𝓽 𝓮𝓼 𝓷𝓸𝓬𝓱 𝓷𝓲𝓬𝓱𝓽 𝓪𝓶 𝓔𝓷𝓭𝓮❤️🧸
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#insta #newfeed #user #sun #2019 #girl #draußen #berlin #germany #deutschland #featureme
  •  75  37 55 minutes ago
  • How do you check if a website asking for your credentials is fake or legit to log in?
    By checking if the URL is correct?
    By checking if the website address is not a homograph?
    By checking if the site is using HTTPS?
    Or using software or browser extensions that detect phishing domains?
    Well, if you, like most Internet users, are also relying on above basic security practices to spot if that "Facebook.com" or "Google.com" you have been served with is fake or not, you may still fall victim to a newly discovered creative phishing attack and end up in giving away your passwords to hackers.
    Antoine Vincent Jebara, co-founder and CEO of password managing software Myki, told us that his team recently spotted a new phishing attack campaign "that even the most vigilant users could fall for." Vincent found that cybercriminals are distributing links to blogs and services that prompt visitors to first "login using Facebook account" to read an exclusive article or purchase a discounted product. That’s fine. Login with Facebook or any other social media service is a safe method and is being used by a large number of websites to make it easier for visitors to sign up for a third-party service quickly.
    However, Vincent discovered that the malicious blogs and online services are serving users with a very realistic-looking fake Facebook login prompt after they click the login button which has been designed to capture users’ entered credentials, just like any phishing site.
    As shown in the picture Vincent shared with us, the fake pop-up login prompt, actually created with HTML and JavaScript, are perfectly reproduced to look and feel exactly like a legitimate browser window—a status bar, navigation bar, shadows and URL to the Facebook website with green lock pad indicating a valid HTTPS. Moreover, users can also interact with the fake browser window, drag it here-and-there or exit it in the same way any legitimate window acts.
    The only way to protect yourself from this type of phishing attack, according to Vincent, "is to actually try to drag the prompt away from the window it is currently displayed in. If dragging it out fails, it's a definite sign that the popup is fake."
  • How do you check if a website asking for your credentials is fake or legit to log in?
By checking if the URL is correct?
By checking if the website address is not a homograph?
By checking if the site is using HTTPS?
Or using software or browser extensions that detect phishing domains?
Well, if you, like most Internet users, are also relying on above basic security practices to spot if that "Facebook.com" or "Google.com" you have been served with is fake or not, you may still fall victim to a newly discovered creative phishing attack and end up in giving away your passwords to hackers.
Antoine Vincent Jebara, co-founder and CEO of password managing software Myki, told us that his team recently spotted a new phishing attack campaign "that even the most vigilant users could fall for." Vincent found that cybercriminals are distributing links to blogs and services that prompt visitors to first "login using Facebook account" to read an exclusive article or purchase a discounted product. That’s fine. Login with Facebook or any other social media service is a safe method and is being used by a large number of websites to make it easier for visitors to sign up for a third-party service quickly.
However, Vincent discovered that the malicious blogs and online services are serving users with a very realistic-looking fake Facebook login prompt after they click the login button which has been designed to capture users’ entered credentials, just like any phishing site.
As shown in the picture Vincent shared with us, the fake pop-up login prompt, actually created with HTML and JavaScript, are perfectly reproduced to look and feel exactly like a legitimate browser window—a status bar, navigation bar, shadows and URL to the Facebook website with green lock pad indicating a valid HTTPS. Moreover, users can also interact with the fake browser window, drag it here-and-there or exit it in the same way any legitimate window acts.
The only way to protect yourself from this type of phishing attack, according to Vincent, "is to actually try to drag the prompt away from the window it is currently displayed in. If dragging it out fails, it's a definite sign that the popup is fake."
  •  19  2 1 hour ago

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  • My love I miss you every day, you did something to me I do not live without you, it's something difficult I want you so much here .
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    #kpop #user #stan #nct #Nctzen #love
  • My love I miss you every day, you did something to me I do not live without you, it's something difficult I want you so much here .
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#kpop #user #stan #nct #Nctzen #love
  •  3  0 1 hour ago
  •  36  2 2 hours ago

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